Should females train for chest development?

Written by Mark Coles - Follow on Google+ | Facebook | Twitter

Is your coach giving you a set chest programme to work through each week?
 
A full chest programme for most women is absolutely pointless.
 
Here are some things to think about:
 
1. Is your goal to improve your bench press, for personal reasons or for your sport. If it is, then adding in bench press or accessory lifts is exactly what you need.
 
2. Is your goal aesthetics and improving how your physique looks overall? Considering that most of your pecs are covered by breast tissue, does mean you're not really going to see much in terms of overall pec development if you hammer them week after week.
 
3. Training your chest too much (at the expense of back and shoulders), will contribute to a large degree of rounding of the shoulders. This will more than likely lead to shoulder impingement injuries and potential posture issues (such as a bad back).
 
4. Breast implants are very common nowadays. They nearly always cause the shoulders to pull forward and facilitate posture issues. Training chest too frequently will only increase the problem, rather than help your shoulders pull back. You're also unable to take the pecs to a fully lengthened position, which often means you're training in a shortened range. This is allowing more potential for injury and further contributing to poor posture.


 
5. A lot of females who do train, like the pec line to their upper chest. So therefore add in upper pec exercises such as incline smith machine press, incline barbell press, dumbbell incline press and flyes (dumbbells and cables). I would usually put upper chest at the start of shoulders, and not leave chest to one full workout (it's completely unnecessary).
 
6. If your coach is giving you high to low cables cross overs for lower pec development, take your money elsewhere.
 
7. Standing tall, having less injuries (especially post child birth), all comes down to smart programming. Focus more on exercises that retract your shoulders (rows etc), train your lower lats and mid back frequently (at least twice a week). Keep chest training to one session, but as per the last point keep it to the start of a workout or tag it on at the end.
 
8. Make sure your programmes are balanced, make sure they make sense, and make sure they're specific to your goal. There are too many coaches trying to make women strong in the bench press because that's what they do. Listen to your clients, if they want an aesthetic and balanced physique, train them accordingly.

Would you like to know the training programme we use with our personl training clients to help them lose fat and change their body shape? Download our 5 Stage Formula for FREE by clicking the button below.

Like this article? Please share it...

Your comments